Results Borneo International Marathon 2013

>> August 31, 2013

Kota Kinabalu (Malaysia),  25 August 2013  “6th Borneo International Marathon (BIM) 2013”
-history of marathon running in Sabah (a state that formerly known as North Borneo, a nation that competed in 1956 Olympics):  According to BIM, the first marathon in Sabah was in 1984, called “Daily Express Sabah Marathon”, and the next one was the 1st BIM in 2008;
-scheduled on May 4-5, however postponed to this date due to the 13th Malaysian General Election;
-marathon stats:  353 finishers (59 females in total / 27 veterans), last placing at 7:31:35 by a male runner;
-prize money, Marathon (1-3) RM 1200 - 1000 – 800;  HMar (1-3) RM 1000 – 800 – 600; visit http://borneomarathon.com/prize for detailed prize money;
-full results visit http://borneomarathon.com/ ;
-all winners and selected results as follows;

MEN
Marathon
1. Kimosop Collins Kipkoror (KEN) 2:51:03 (net 2:35:21 !!)
2. Fabian Osmond Daimon 2:55:08
3. Samri Butak 3:08:00
4. Aliakbar Gapor (BRU) 3:21:5
5. John Lophienne (BEL) 3:26:00
Veteran (40y)
1. Kevin Yuen Juan Lee 3:31:39

Half Marathon
1. Thomas Kiposgei (KEN) 1:12:48
2. Samson Kiplagat Tenai (KEN) 1:16:02
3. David Mutai (KEN) 1:20:03
4. Wincentbert Latius 1:24:49
5. Ruston Masri 1:26:04
6. Guainus Salagan 1:27:03 (1st veteran)

10 km run
1. Abdul Aziz Mahamoud 39:52

10 km run (school boys) (18y and below)
1. Lim Wei Kuang 41:47

WOMEN
Marathon
1. Jacquelyn John (MAS?)  4:04:24
2. Judy Liew Ye Ling 4:15:20
3. Jong Kiat Ngo 4:20:11
4. Wang Sing Yee (SIN) 4:26:44
5. Leong Siew Shen 4:31:44
Veteran (40y)
1. Kona Liau 3:38:27  (21km 1:49:04)
2. Ewe Bee Hong 3:47:51
3. Li Mung Lan (HKG) 3:53:52
4. Teo Lay Tin (SIN) 4:16:42
5. Tse Suk Fun (HKG) 4:20:11

Half Marathon
1. Grace Wayua Kitonga (KEN) 1:29:55
2. Sarah Burns GBR 1:46:52
3. Rita Gani 1:48:22
4. Lorna Wong 1:53:40
5. Stephanie Dupont (FRA) 1:56:48
Veteran (40y)
1. Maggie Goh Kim Hong 1:49:01

10 km run
1. Katarina Andersen (?) 45:17
2. Tamika Baynes (?) 46:21
3. Hyenie Roslin Danius 49:11
4. Shamala Jeanne Chandran 52:24
5. Chong Vun Lung 52:40

10 km run (school girls) (18y and below)
1. Nelce Sulaiman 51:54
2. Freda Awang Pan 52:58

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Results 2013 Tanjung 10 km run in Penang

>> August 26, 2013

Penang,  25 August 2013  "Tanjung 10 km race"
-selected results as follows;

MEN
Senior (18-34y)
1. Ruburn Kumar s/o Ramasamy 33:20
2. Calvin Boon Chong Yik 34:48
3. Christopher s/o Soosai 35:12
4. Gouranithyaa s/o Kathiresan 36:21
5. Muhammad Firdaus Abdul Rashid 37:22
6. Raagaventhiran s/o Muniandy 39:19
7. Harivel s/o Suresh Kumar 39:25
8. Kho Ko Khing 40:21

Boys (13-17y)
1. Chandirann s/o Kalyana Kumar 39:35
2. Tey Feng Nian 39:51
3. Muhilendhran s/o Somasundaram 40:19

Junior Veteran (35-44y)
1. Simion Ruto (KEN) 33:14
2. Muniandy s/o M.Kisna 40:04
3. Choong Kin Eve 41:05

Senior Veteran (>44y)
1. Khir Salleh 36:37
2. Ng Hoe Looi 42:23
3. Tan Tik Mea 42:37

WOMEN
Senior (18-34y)
1. Ailyn Arjona (?) 47:23
2. Teh Suat Lay 49:00
3. Chew Lay Ling 49:36
4. Angel Ch'ng Suat Ping 50:34
5. Ranjetta Poobathy 52:24
6. Chee Ai Yen 53:38

Girls (13-17y)
1. Loges d/o Vikneswaran 47:00
2. Ooi Yuu Mei 47:21
3. Vikneswaary d/o Sathiamoorthy 49:11
4. Jeyasree d/o Rajenthiran 50:44
5. Sharumathi d/o Arumugam 50:48
6. Vinothini d/o Palanisamy 51:49

Junior Veteran (35-44y)
1. -no name- 48:44
2. Lee Choon Hun 48:44
3. Toh Hui Sung 52:44

Senior Veteran (>44)
1. Kamala Devi d/o Kolanthai 49:17
2. Khoo Siew Suan 51:00
3. Blenda Lee 53:53

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Malaysian Athletes in 2013 Torino World Masters

>> August 24, 2013

World Masters Games (WMG)  is an international multi-sport event held every four years. The 8th edition of WMG was held in Torino Italy from 2 - 11 August 2013.  Up to a total of 30 sports contested for each category (age group) starting 25y group (25-29) to 100 years.  Results by Malaysian athletes as follows;

MEN

M40 (40-45)
5000m track walk (  4):  ...4. Suresh Kumar s/o Goobinnaan 27:24.89
10km road walk  (  7):  ...5. Suresh Kumar s/o Goobinnaan 56:48
Half Marathon (10): ...dnf: Suresh Kumar s/o Goobinnaan


M55 (55-59)
Decathlon (  4):  ...2. Aliudin Jumaat (13.22 - 4.59 - 6.96/6kg - 1.51 - 62.35 ; 19.53/91cm - 23.94/1.5kg - 3.00 - 26.13/700g - 6:21.40)


M65 (65-69)
5000m track walk (  4): ...dq: Thomas Kok (after 4000m)
10km road walk (  7): ...4. Thomas Kok 1:02:02



Suresh, Aliudin, and Thomas represented Malaysia in 2013 World Masters

Aliudin Jumaat won silver medal in M55 decathlon

Suresh Kumar (left) during 5000m track walk

Thomas Kok (right) during 10km road walk
Suresh Kumar was leading the field during mid-way of 10km road walk


Photos courtesy of Suresh Kumar.

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Asian Youth Games Nanjing 2013 Concluded (Track and Field Athletics)

>> August 23, 2013


The heatwave conditions on the first three days were replaced by milder temperatures on the final evening of the four day track and field competition at the Asian Youth Games, being held in Nanjing, China, this week. The games were open to athletes aged 15 or 16 years and the same athletes will be age-eligible for the second IOC Youth Olympic Games to be held next year in the same city.


Healthy crowd numbers in excess of 20,000 on most evenings augurs well for next year’s youth Olympics. As we have come to know, the enthusiastic Chinese crowds politely support all competitors, but can always find an extra cheer for a host nation athlete.

Team China dominated the competition taking 19 gold, ahead of Japan 4, Thailand 3, Korea and Chinese Taipei with two and on one medal Vietnam, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Independent Olympic Athletes.

The limelight was shared by many of the athletes who a month earlier had competed at the IAAF world youth championships in Donetsk Ukraine, while many athletes achieved top three world age ranging performances.
 
Takumu Furuya ran the second fastest time in the World (by D. Tarbotton)
Japan’s Takumu Furuya stamped himself as one of the finest all round junior hurdlers in the world. At the recent IAAF world youth championships, he placed an outstanding fourth in the 400m hurdles, in an under-17 years world leading time of 51.00 seconds. But at the Asian Youth Games, he switched his attention to the 110m hurdles. Arriving at the meet he owned a personal best of 13.92, which he smashed in the heat, running 13.64, before destroying this best again with 13.36 in the final - the second fastest time in the world for his age.
"From the preliminary to the final, everything was smooth, although I got an injury some days before I came here. But finally I made it, I got the gold medal, I am so happy," Furuya said.
Second in the hurdles was Sri Lanka’s Akila Ravisanka, a year 11 high school student from a village outside of Columbo. Coached by Indika Jayasinghe, Ravisanka clocked a big personal best time of 13.99.

In the women’s 100m hurdles, Nana Fujimori (JPN) lived up to expectations coasting to the line nearly a flight ahead of her closest rival, Vietnam’s Thi Lan Nguyen. There was unsteadiness on the line at the first attempt to start the race, but no one was awarded a break.
“The first false start had no effect on me,” commented Fujimori, whose winning time of 13.69, into a slight headwind, was faster than she recorded at the recent IAAF world youth championships, where she progressed to the semi-finals. But the time was still outside her personal best of 13.66 recorded in 2012. Nguyen, clocked 14.43 for the silver medal, just ahead of Indonesia’s Ken Ayuthaya Purnama in 14.45.

One coach and one school in China, have produced four gold medallists at the AYG. Junwei Yang, a coach at the Lianyungang Sports school in Lianyungang city, located in the Jiangsu Province which is hosting the AYG, has coached athletes to four titles in the throwing events. The performance levels from the athletes were of the highest quality with all athletes achieving distance moving them into the world top-four for 2013. The gold rush started on the second night with Yin Dong (CHN) winning the girls’ shot put title with a distance of 16.84m.
"She was a little impetuous in her second put, so I told her that she should watch her psychological attitude," said coach Yang.
“She will try her best to take part in Youth Olympic Games next year. I hope she can be selected to the national team. She trains five times a week and every time for 1.5 hours.”
Later that evening Yuanbo Ding (CHN) won the boys’ hammer throw title by over 10 metres with a distance of 73.73m, the third best throw in the world by an under-17 age athlete.
On the final evening, two of Yang’s athletes won the discus titles.
Bronze medallists at the recent world youth championships, Yulong Cheng (CHN) dominated the boys’ discus from his first throw of 58.30m. His series included two throws over 60 metres, but his best of 62.03m on the final throw, was just short of his personal record of 62.80m, set in Donetsk, which was the world’s leading under-17 performance this year.
"I didn't feel good about the last throw. I was a little surprised because I didn't expect to throw that far,” he said. "I'm very excited. It's not until today that all my toil and sweat finally paid off. I'm grateful for the chance that allowed me to perform well here."
The fourth gold for the Yang-coached group was nailed by girls’ discus champion, Kangping Sun (CHN), who set a world leading performance of 49.28m in the first round to win gold by nearly five metres.
“I'm very excited now. In the beginning of the competition, I felt very nervous, but I got more and more relaxed. My coach told me to compete at my normal level, take it easy and perform as usual.”

Aged just 15 years, Hussain Al Hizam is Saudi Arabia’s best ever pole vaulter, raising the national open record on five occasions this year, taking it from 4.95m to 5.27m. This week in Nanjing, he opened his competition with 4.60m which he cleared on his second attempt to put him in second place behind Iraq’s Muntadher Abdulwahid who had cleared on his first attempt. At 4.70m, Abdulwahid missed his attempts, while Al Hizam negotiated the height on his third attempt to take the title.

The boys’ javelin was a come from behind win to Chinese Taipei’s Jenwei Tsai. After three rounds China’s Zhuqing Su led comfortably with his first round throw of 67.35m, ahead of Sungming Lee (TPE) on 65.90m and Ao Zhou (CHN) with 64.94m. But the competition changed dramatically when in round five, Tsai, a student at National Yilan Senior High School, launched the javelin out to 70.41m to take the lead by over three metres. Su tried his best and responded with a personal record of 67.51m on the event’s final throw, to confirm the silver medal.
"My best throw tonight was made when I felt well and I found my confidence back,” said Tsai.
“My earlier throws were not that good, so I adjusted mentality. I took a medal, which made me happy and satisfied. But I won't have a party or travel in Nanjing to celebrate. I will fly back (home) soon, because when school starts I will have many other competitions."

Favourite for the boys’ shot, was local athlete Jianping Han who started slowly, eventually securing the victory with his very last throw of 18.87m. Japan’s Yume Ando, led early with 17.36m in round three, eventually putting 18.07m in round four for his best of the day.
"I am very excited and I had never thought about this result. I broke my own record (18.50m) and reached a new level - 18.87m.,” said Han.
"I am now studying at Jiangsu 101 High School and I keep training during my study time."

Maurice Nicholas (SIN), Honorary Secretary of the Asian Athletics Association, was full of praise for the organisers.
"Let me congratulate the organisers on a very well organised games that is running so well. Perhaps the most beautiful thing is that everything runs on time. I simply couldn't find any problems."
He was also pleased with the performances of the athletes.
"It's been very, very encouraging. It is wonderful to see all the personal bests up on the scoreboard so often. This is a very good sign for the youth of Asia, and for athletics in Asia.”

Article by David Tarbotton


READ: ASIAN Youth Games 2013 (Athletics): Preview - Day 1 - Day 2 - Day 3 - Day 4  (by David Tarbotton)

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Athletics Report Asian Youth Games Nanjing 2013



Asian Youth Games – day four review (22 August 2013)

An afternoon storm in Nanjing, was a welcome relief from the heat wave conditions the athletes endured on the first three days. The lower temperatures were also timely with four endurance events on the program.

The outstanding success of coach Junwei Yang continued on the final evening on the AYG with his athletes claiming the two discus titles on offer in world leading performances.
Bronze medallists at the recent world youth championships, Yulong Cheng (CHN) dominated the boys’ discus from his first throw of 58.30m. His series included two throws over 60 metres, but his best of 62.03m on the final throw, was just short of his personal record of 62.80m, set in Donetsk, which was the world’s leading under-17 performance this year.
"I didn't feel good about the last throw. I was a little surprised because I didn't expect to throw that far,” he said. "I'm very excited. It's not until today that all my toil and sweat finally paid off. I'm grateful for the chance that allowed me to perform well here."
The fourth gold for the Yang-coached group was nailed by girls’ discus champion, Kangping Sun (CHN), who set a world leading performance of 49.28m in the first round to win gold by nearly five metres.
“I'm very excited now. In the beginning of the competition, I felt very nervous, but I got more and more relaxed. My coach told me to compete at my normal level, take it easy and perform as usual.”

Yang and his four throwers from Lianyungang Sports school in Jiangsu Province, depart Nanjing with four titles and a string of outstanding performances.

Hunan sprinter Guifen Huang (CHN), who won her speciality the 400 metres on day two, added the 200 metres title tonight in Nanjing with a massive personal best of 23.82, her first ever sub-24 performance.
A semi-finalist in the 400 metres at last month’s IAAF world youth championships, Huang hopes to continue her career on the international stage.
"I hope to take part in some bigger international sporting events, and I plan to take part in the YOG next year."

The athletes in the 3000 metre events led from the gun and were never under threat as they took the titles.
Liu Hongliang (CHN), a student at Inner Mongolia Vocational College of Physical Education in Tuquan City, led at each kilometre, passed in very uneven splits, of 2:57, 2:42 and 2:46, hitting the line in 8:25.86. In the girls race, Japan’s Fukiko Ando was even more dominant. She recorded kilometres splits of 3:05, 3:09 and 3:09, stopping the clock at 9:23.50, 10 seconds outside her personal best. Ando had run away from the field very early and after four laps led the Korean pair, working together, by 30 metres. This was extended to 120 metres by the finish line.

Indian athlete, Anjana Dhavalu Thamake, running for the Independent Olympic Athletes team, came from behind to win the girls 800 metres in 2:11.47. In the boy’s 800m, Korea’s Sangmin Lee led at the bell in 56.61, going on to win in 1:54.64.

Other winners on the final evening were:
·         Chun-Han Yang (TPE) boys’ 200m 21.47
·         Witthawal Thumcha (THA) boys’ 400m hurdles 52.79
·         Ying Yu (CHN) girls’ 400m hurdles 63.28
·         Yuji Hiramatsu (JPN) boys’ high jump 2.06m
·         Yue Ma (CHN) girls’ triple jump 12.55m

Healthy crowd numbers in excess of 20,000 on most evenings augurs well for next year’s youth Olympics. As we have come to know, the enthusiastic Chinese crowds politely support all competitors, but can always find an extra cheer for a host nation athlete.

Team China dominated the competition taking 19 gold, ahead of Japan 4, Thailand 3, Korea and Chinese Taipei with two each and on one medal Vietnam, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Independent Olympic Athletes.

Maurice Nicholas (SIN), Honorary Secretary of the Asian Athletics Association, was full of praise for the organisers.
"Let me congratulate the organisers on a very well organised games that is running so well. Perhaps the most beautiful thing is that everything runs on time. I simply couldn't find any problems."

However Mr Nicholas has been concerned with the lack of athletes converting this junior success into senior ranks.
"Perhaps the biggest (challenge) is the attrition. The youth are doing very well at the moment and this is good for (next year's Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing) but due to studies and other things, the number of Asian athletes in the (older groups) dwindles. We hope this will change with these great results (in Nanjing).

“This is the first step, the youth, next we have the juniors and then the seniors. It is a very good sign to see these youth doing so well in Nanjing. It's been very, very encouraging. It is wonderful to see all the personal bests up on the scoreboard so often. This is a very good sign for the youth of Asia, and for athletics in Asia.”

David Tarbotton for AdrianSprints.com

*photo- Thailand athlete Tontrakan Chuthueng competed in boys discus throw (by Lintao Zhang) 
 
READ: ASIAN Youth Games 2013 (Athletics): Preview - Day 1 - Day 2 - Day 3
 

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Athletics Report Day 3 - Asian Youth Games 2013

>> August 22, 2013



Asian Youth Games – day three review

After China’s dominance on day two, it was Japan’s turn, courtesy of two fine sprint hurdlers, to steel the limelight on day three of the Asian Youth Games, currently being held in Nanjing. Along with Japan, five other countries, China, Syria, Korea, Vietnam and Thailand shared the gold medals.

Takumu Furuya (Asian AA)
Tonight, Japan’s Takumu Furuya stamped himself as one of the finest all round junior hurdlers in the world. At the recent IAAF world youth championships, he placed an outstanding fourth in the 400m hurdles, in a 16-years world leading time of 51.00 seconds. But at the Asian Youth championships, he switched his attention to the 110m hurdles. Arriving at the meet he owned a personal best of 13.92, which he smashed in the heat, running 13.64, before destroying his best again with 13.36 in the final - the second fastest time in the world for his age.
"From the preliminary to the final, everything was smooth, although I got an injury some days before I came here. But finally I made it, I got the gold medal, I am so happy," he said.
Second in the hurdles was Sri Lanka’s Akila Ravisanka, a year 11 high school student from a village outside of Columbo. Coached by Indika Jayasinghe, Ravisanka clocked a big personal best time of 13.99.

In the women’s 100m hurdles, Nana Fujimori (JPN) lived up to expectations coasting to the line nearly a flight ahead of her closest rival, Vietnam’s Nguyen Thi Lan. There was unsteadiness at on the line at the first attempt to start the race, but no one awarded a break.
“The first false start had no effect on me,” commented Fujimori, whose winning time of 13.69, into a slight headwind, was faster than she recorded at the recent IAAF world youth championships, where she progressed to the semi-finals. But the time was still outside her personal best of 13.66 recorded in 2012. Nguyen, clocked 14.43 for the silver medal, just ahead of Indonesia’s Ken Ayuthaya Purnama in 14.45.

After three rounds the girls javelin was a fairly close battle between Korea’s Youngin Kang and Wan-Chi Chang of Chinese Taipei, with both throwing in the 45 to 47 metre range. But the competition was ripped apart in round four when Kang, added four metres to her personal best with an enormous throw of 54.31m. The distance also moved Kang from outside the world top 12 rankings to number three under-17 javelin thrower this year. After temporarily losing second position, Chang closed out the competition herself with a personal best of 47.75m and the silver medal.

Local athlete, Yin Dong from Lianyungang city in Jiangsu Province, dominated the girls’ shot put. Her winning put of 15.58m eventually would have been sufficient to win, but she extended this twice, with marks of 16.69m and 16.84m to claim the gold by 1.58 metres from Korea’s Yusun Jeong who put 15.26 on her fifth attempt. Dong’s distance also moved her to number four in the world.
"Firstly, I'd like to appreciate government officials for their help and support. Then, I want to celebrate and share my joy with my coach,” said Dong, referring to one of the meet’s most successful coaches, Junwei Yang who also coaches last evening boys’ hammer throwing champion Yuanbo Ding. Dong and Ding attend the Lianyungang Sports School.
"She was a little impetuous in her second put, so I told her that she should watch her psychological attitude," said coach Yang.
“She will try her best to take part in Youth Olympic Games next year. I hope she can be selected to the national team. She trains five times a week and every time for 1.5 hours.”

Syria’s Raya Fatima had little trouble accounting for the girls’ 2000 metres steeplechase field. After running the initial lap with the pack, Fatima moved away from the field, and was particularly strong over the last lap to cross the line in 7:07.82, over 20 seconds ahead of silver medallist Vietnam’s Tran Thi Mai.

Nguyen Thi Truc (VIE) claimed the toughest leg of a potential horizontal jumps double, when she took gold in the girls’ long jump. Nguyen, leapt a best of 5.90m on her third attempt, just short of her national junior championships winning distance of 5.97m. One of the finest triple jumpers in the world for her age, Nguyen starts favourite tomorrow night in her speciality.

Thailand’s Khathawut Meanim, bounded into the world’s top-10 boys’ triple jumpers with a first round personal best of 15.11m, a distance which would hold up for gold.

There was a close battle in the boys’ 2000m steeplechase until the bell, when Hu Ma sprinted away from his teammate Aihemaiti Ainikeerjiang. Ma, who clocked 5:53.16 was so excited he sprinted a victory.
“I didn’t expect that I would get such a great result before the race,” said Ma, an inexperienced steeplechaser. “It hasn’t been long since I practiced steeplechase running, I feared that I won’t get past those barriers.”
The Chinese teammates had run side by side until the bell.
“He (the silver) and I are teammates. We cooperated with each other during the race. I followed him rather than run ahead.”

Ainikeerjiang, from Inner Mongolia, clocked 6:00.31, 10 seconds outside his goal.
"I didn't feel very good today, but it was passable, because my goal is 5:50 minutes. My teammate (Ma) and I had a strategy today because my usual performance is better than his, so I led. On the last lap, me and him, sprinted for the gold, but I was worn out, so I only get the silver medal."
It has taken time for Ainikeerjiang to convince family and friends to support him in his running.
"I started practicing athletics when I was 12, and at first my mom didn't allow me to practice athletics because she thought it was too hard for me, but I didn't think so and have stuck to it. There were people who doubted my ability, but I wasn't affected by what others said, and I tried my best and ranked second place when they selected athletes to participate in the AYG, and I made it and proved myself now."

David Tarbotton for AdrianSprints.com

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